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27 September, 2004

So you think you know Marillion

When the plane carrying Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens, as was) was redirected from Washington DC to Maine for him to be refused admission to the USA, Marillion were on the same flight, a fact their marketing manager is still trying to milk.
I can't help finding it a little distasteful to exploit a chance non-involvement in a serious example of an alleged democracy equating criticism with terrorism: "it's none of your business, your clients aren't the story, shut up".

This is all a preamble to saying that the non-issue at least led me to an article in the London News Review about the attraction - and simultaneous repulsion - of Fish-era Marillion. Yes, that music was pompous. Yes, it was 'of its time', by which I mean I think the lyrics have dated, and would feel a little embarassed about listening to it in company (as would Fish, I suspect). Yet it's stirring stuff, and fun, and I like it.

Okay, that was another preamble, and here's the main point: Fish was a member of Marillion for four albums, departing in 1988. That's sixteen years ago. In that time, Marillion have released nine more, very different albums with h (Steve Hogarth): modern Marillion is not the band of 'Kayleigh' or 'Script For A Jester's Tear', and any comparison is pointless.

Comments

Your comments are apposite. However, the fact remains that Marillion's most popular period was when Fish was the singer and many of their fans drifted away when he left.

You shouldn't be embarrassed about listening to anything you like in public! Be proud of what you like, even if 17-minute epics about mythical monsters aren't exactly hip these days! (Were they ever?)

I agree with you that it's rather distasteful of their marketing manager is trying to milk their peripheral involvement with a news story, though.

Posted by Jon. at September 28, 2004 05:56 AM
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